Quarantine Watch Party: Venom Viewing Notes @ComicBook @BrandonDavisBD #Venom #SONY

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Last night was a long-overdue quarantine watch party for Venom. I’ve mentioned Venom before, but these are my viewing notes for the movie.

Side Note: The first time I saw Tom Hardy was in Star Trek: Nemesis, which is a guilty pleasure of mine. So yeah, I know, <slow-witted voice>”But Star Trek Nemesis sucks, man!”</slow-witted voice> Regardless, Hardy showed me something in that movie.

Second Side Note: The “technical difficulties” to which I refer below are just commercial breaks I can’t fast forward. Even though I’m on commercial free Hulu, I still get commercials when streaming from an established network like FX. The commercial breaks are five minutes long, and I’m trying to keep up with the other attendees at the quarantine watch party. Sort of ruined it for me.

Outside of combat, what superhero (in the movies) rides a motorcycle? I can’t think of any. Does it have to do with the fact that Venom is an anti-hero? Directors and screenwriters make these choices intentionally.

“Heights aren’t really my thing.” Foreshadowing.

It’s funny how the ambushing journalist is presented as the good guy despite us not really knowing how much of a bad guy the mark is.

“What you did got me fired.” No, what *you* did got you fired and should get you disbarred.

Killing all of those people at the market seemed unnecessary.

Due to technical difficulties, there’s a gap in my viewing here. You’re welcome.

“This is First Contact.”

Origin Of First Contact Day Explained!
No, this is.

Nice special effects on the “possession.”

Due to technical difficulties, there’s a gap in my viewing here. You’re welcome.

Now that the symbiote is inside him, Eddie is superhuman, yet he doesn’t seem to be asking himself why. I guess he’s more concerned with the bullets that are flying by his head. You’d think he’d have some time while hanging out in that tree.

I’ve been that thirsty before.

When the voices in your head say, “Do not open the door,” you … call a shrink.

Technical difficulties. Dammit. Way too many commercials.

“My legs are broken and now they’re not. What’s happening?” Has Eddie never seen an action movie before?

Awww, what a cute kid … WTF?!

Even more “technical difficulties.”

I can’t wait to see Venom face Spidey.

There’s a lot more character development in this movie than I appreciated the first time around.

Bye bye, puppy.

I really wish the villain didn’t always have the same powers as the (anti-)hero. It’s trite at this point.

Freaking technical difficulties.

This has to be the weirdest fight scene I’ve ever seen. Sure, the special effects are great, but this is just weird. But I like it.

Superhero movies have no concern for the economic damage the characters cause. 🙂

Damn, that was one hell of a Stan Lee cameo.

Tater tots? Who does Venom think he is? Napoleon Dynamite?

If I had a voice in my head, I wonder if I could suppress my instinct to reply out loud. Of course, I hope I never find out.

Carnage is coming.

And that’s a wrap on the quarantine watch party.

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No Small Parts: William Ginter Riva in Spiderman Far from Home @OfficialPeterB @BrandonDavisBD @ComicBook #QuarantineWatchParty #Spiderman

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Last night was another quarantine watch party hosted by Brandon Davis of ComicBook.com. This time it was Spiderman: Far from Home, and the small part I want to highlight is William Ginter Riva. There were several characters that helped Beck in his master plan. William was one of those characters. He had a small part . . . twice. He first appeared in Iron Man.

Jump to 0:10. Or just wait for it. It’s only 10 seconds.

Then he appeared again in Far from Home.

Jump to 2:10.

Unlike the other No Small Parts entries, he probably got a bit over 2 minutes of screen time, but the added value of this part is the connection it draws between the first modern MCU film, Iron Man, and the first one after which Tony Stark had died (representing a coda to the Tony Stark legacy). The thing that amazes me the most about the MCU is that I can’t think of any cinematic universe that tied together so many independent stories that collectively told a bigger one. Star Trek came close, and Star Wars came closer, but the MCU is the new standard for such a thing. Every movie stands 100% on its own yet tells a common story across 23 films. The fact that William appeared only at the very beginning and then at the very end makes the MCU feel a little bit more real, and thus relatable.

William was a small but significant way to remind us of that larger story, so I can’t help but appreciate this role.

Side note: What some may not know is that William was played by Peter Billingsley, who played Ralphie in 1983’s A Christmas Story. The best part, of course, is that they made a (not so?) subtle reference to “You’ll shoot your eye out.”

Jump to 2:33 for the reference.

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