Happy Thanksgiving, Nerds! #Thanksgiving #DnD #TTRPG #RPG #StarTrek #TNG @BrainClouds

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

A few years ago, David posted this stat block, which he recirculated recently.

Oddly, he received criticism for the stat block along the lines of, among other things, “wild turkeys can’t fly!” This is a stupid criticism because 1) dire turkeys are works of fiction in which magic may be involved, so they can be whatever the creator wants; and 2) even if you disregard #1, regardless of its biological cousins, even birds as large as an ostriches or cassowaries can’t fly because their just too damn big. Personally, I think my response (on Facebook) was the best he received.

If only Mr. Carlson had had access to this stat block in 1978….

But what would the holidays be without a little Star Trek thrown in?

It wouldn’t be a holiday at all, that’s what!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow David @BrainClouds

In case the tweet is deleted, here’s the image.

An Old Commercial @StarTrek #StarTrek

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

Sundays now are lazy days for me. I either post something silly or other people’s work. Usually both. Today, it’s a commercial advertising Star Trek Enterprise. I never saw it.

This commercial is from 2000 or 2001. Why does it look like it’s from the 80s?

I’m old.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Star Tre @StarTrek


“What’s Old Is New” Watch: Strange New Worlds Series Premiere! @ansonmount @StarTrek @paramountplus @StarTrekOnPPlus #StarTrek #StrangeNewWorlds #Picard #Borg #GoodWatch

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

I got up at 5:30 am this morning to see the second season finale of Picard and the series premiere of Strange New Worlds. As to the latter, I haven’t been this excited for a Star Trek series since Next Generation was announced. First, it’s purported to be a return to the episodic format that I prefer (though I hear there will be an larger, overlayed story, which is fine). Second — I never thought I’d say this — Anson Mount’s Captain Pike has overtaken William Shatner’s Captain Kirk as my favorite Captain.

No cheese zone.

This still looks like a large, ensemble cast, so it won’t likely take over as my favorite series, but you never know. It certainly started off great. TOS is back, but without all the cheesy, 60s-era TV technology that the young-uns can’t seem to get past. Also, season2 of Picard ended today, and I was pretty happy with that as well. Here’s a spoiler for the last episode.

Called it!

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Anson Mount @ansonmount
Follow Paramount+ @paramountplus
Follow Star Trek on Paramount+ @StarTrekOnPPlus
Follow Star Trek @StarTrek

A Star Trek Christmas! @StarTrek #Christmas #StarTrek

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

I was raised Catholic, but I’m, let’s just say, unaffiliated at the moment. Still, if there were any reason for me to engage in holiday traditions, it would be Christmas. In fact, people like me have influenced United States Supreme Court precedent on the Establishment Clause, but that’s a story for another day.

Patrick Stewart likes to talk about Star Trek as the modern human’s mythology, and I guess that applies to me. So, here’s my means to celebrate Christmas. Sort of. It’s all the memes that hit my stream this year, some of which are new to me. This is my mythology.

From one of the best episodes of TNG.

Fortunately, I never have to worry about this sort of thing.

Kirk is such a hound dog.

I would buy this outfit.

Ouch.

Some more decorations.

Humans apparently still celebrate Christmas in 2364, as evidenced by their viewing of Christmas movies.

Worf never got it. He never got anything.

But seriously . . .

Worf I get, but Gowron? I had no idea that Klingons celebrated Christmas.

Happy Star Trek Day … I mean, holidays!

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Star Trek @StarTrek

The Starfleet Insignia Explained @KesselJunkie @StarTrek #StarTrek

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

Yesterday I recorded my second-ever podcast. Again, it was with my cousin, Kessel Junkie, and again it was Star Trek related. In light of that, I bring up a related, recurring social phenomenon. Every now and then, a misconception enjoys new life on the internet despite having been thoroughly debunked just a few years prior. This one came up again recently. Many people still think that the Star Trek “arrowhead” logo denotes a specific ship, the Enterprise.

Well, no, it doesn’t. As this article on StarTrek.com explains, the arrowhead insignia is the insignia for Starfleet. All Starfleet crew are supposed to use it. The misconception arose from an error in production for the episode, Charlie X, in which a ship’s crew was given a different insignia. That ship, however, was not part of Starfleet. The crew “were the equivalent of merchant marine or freighter personnel,” and thus didn’t use the arrowhead insignia.

I’m not sure how this misconception stays alive after all these bouts with social media. The communication badges for every single person I can think of in Next Generation are based on the arrowhead insignia. That alone should have put this puppy to rest long ago.

Yeah, I know. It’s not the end of the world, but have you ever met a Star Trek fan? Despite unavoidable inconsistencies, but producers and fans alike want consistency from episode to episode and series to series. Considering how extensive the Star Trek intellectual property is, it’s amazing that we’ve enjoyed that.

I’m probably going to have to re-blog this after another five years.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Kessel Junkie @KesselJunkie
Follow Star Trek @StarTrek

You Can’t Just Hit the Control Panel and Expect Results @StarTrek @starwars #StarTrek #StarWars

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

I’m feeling lazy, and my topics have been too serious lately, so that means it’s time to renew the rivalry.

Quit kidding yourselves, nerds. Dei ex Machina are cheap**. You need an actual engineer.

**They can be funny, though.

Star Trek >> Star Wars

Follow me on Twitter at @gsllc
Follow Star Trek @StarTrek
Follow Star Wars @starwars

The Best Breakfast Cereals @StarTrek @jonathansfrakes @wilw @RobertPicardo @ScottBakula #StarTrek

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

Going forward, Sundays are lazy days for me. I either post something silly or other people’s work. Usually both. Today, I use a meme to highlight the fact that last week was the first time in decades that I’ve eaten breakfast cereal.

I couldn’t find any of these, so Froot Loops had to do.

Seriously, why aren’t these a real thing?

Follow me on Twitter at @gsllc
Follow Star Trek @StarTrek
Follow Jonathan Frakes @jonathansfrakes
Follow Wil Wheaton @wilw
Follow @RobertPicardo
Follow Scott Bakula @ScottBakula

Star Trek Starship Orientation @davekellett @StarTrek #StarTrek

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

I recently came across this comic panel on Facebook, which I found on Twitter.

I have no idea if anyone has ever discussed this before, but my uncle and I had this conversation during the Next Generation run (I’m guessing around 1991). His idea was that the shape of these ships was influenced by their need to maximize combat efficiency. As a result, the best chances a starship had of winning an encounter is to be oriented face first towards the opponents. The problem is that the opponents had the same design characteristic, and it was difficult to get either ship into a bad position when facing off before combat started. That seemed reasonable to me.

However, it was really about things not looking stupid, or more generally making sure the viewers understood what they saw. For example, there was an episode of Next Generation called Power Play in which the Enterprise approached the “southern polar region” of a moon. In space, the “south pole” is really meaningless, but okay, fine. They approached the south pole. Why did they orient themselves like this?

Look, I couldn’t find a screenshot, and all I have is MS Paint. (Dave, please let me know if you have a problem with me using this modification of your work.)

The ship was shown underneath the planet, still right side up, but up and down make no sense in space. Why isn’t the ship upside down? In the alternative, why isn’t the ship right side up but above the planet (thus reversing the y axis of the shot)? The answer, of course, is to communicate to the viewer that the ship is at the south pole without disorientating them. It’s just a TV show after all.

So yeah, it’s probably about things not looking stupid.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Dave Kellet @davekellett
Follow Star Trek @StarTrek

In case the tweet is ever deleted, here’s a copy of it. However, to avoid infringing his copyright, I don’t reproduce the image at issue here.

Star Trek Intakes #StarTrek #NCC1701 #TV

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

Sundays are now lazy days for me. Going forward, I’m just going to re-post other people’s work or just do something silly. In light of this post appearing between my viewing notes for the Star Trek: The Next Generation movies, today is a series of Next Generation bloopers that were put back into the shows.

If you don’t like this post, please note that the original subject of the post was deleted from the internet. I was in a rush. 🙂

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc (please retweet!)