At Least HBO Didn’t Buy It @starwars @DragonFlyJonez #StarWars #Disney #HBO

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it.

Going forward, Sundays are lazy days for me. I either post something silly or other people’s work. Usually both. Today, I note that some people have complained that Disney bought Star Wars, because, let’s face it, people want to complain. Here’s a reminder that things could always be worse.

While were dealing with Star Wars related memes . . . .

Star Trek >> Star Wars

Follow me on Twitter at @gsllc
Follow Star Wars @starwars
Follow Dragon Fly Jonez @DragonFlyJonez

Good Watch: The Last Six Episodes of Star Wars: The Clone Wars @StarWars @disneyplus #StarWars #Disney

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it. For other entries in the Good Watch category, click here.

Some time ago, I watched the first couple of episodes of the Clone Wars and was bored to tears. With all the content I need to watch, I have no time for a show to “get good after a few seasons.” However, with the success of the Mandalorian and its apparent tie-ins to the Clone Wars, I was told to watch the last few episodes just to get some good context.

I really enjoyed those last few episodes, but not because of the tie in to the Mandalorian. Six episodes didn’t give me enough context to develop any connection to Ahsoka Tano nor to the Mandalorian, Bo-Katan Kryze. Instead, I loved that the show’s ending ran parallel with Revenge of the Sith — right down to the music — but managed to have its own ending. Unlike a large (or at least vocal) number of you that hated Revenge of the Sith, I thought it was one of the best of the films from all three trilogies (though none of them beat Rogue One as far as I’m concerned). It was as if I was watching an extended cut of that movie; same movie, but with new content. So, for an entirely different reason, it was a really good watch.

I still think bringing back Maul cheapens his (and everyone else’s) death. As always, YMMV.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Star Wars @StarWars
Follow Disney Plus @disneyplus

Classic Movies: The Nightmare Before Christmas @disneyplus #ClassicWatch #DisneyPlus

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it. For other entries in the Good Watch category, click here.

My Classic Movies category is reserved for movies like Citizen Kane and Casablanca, but I couldn’t help but include this movie in that series. It’s only 27 years old, but it’s a movie that everyone told me is a “must-watch.” Thought I enjoyed it, and it’s probably as good as any Halloween movie for viewing during that holiday season, I wouldn’t place it in that category. As with many movies, this one may have earned its reputation based on nostalgia rather than filmmaking technique.

Or not. Maybe it simply didn’t trigger things in me that it does in most others.

Even if you also merely like it, it’s short, fun, and thematic, so it’s not a bad watch at all. As always, YMMV.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Disney Plus @disneyplus

Historical Watch: The Greeks, Plus a Little Pontificating on History @disneyplus #GoodWatch

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it. For other entries in the Good Watch category, click here.

So I did!

I don’t read fiction. I’d rather read a text book. Moreover, I’ve often noted that if I didn’t have to work for a living, I’d probably go back to school and earn three degrees: economics, psychology, and history. You won’t earn a PhD watching the Greeks, but there’s plenty of information to digest from the show. It’s an interesting summary of the story of the ancient Greeks, and how they shaped modern culture. If you’re a D&D player interested in the new book, Mythic Odysseys of Theros, it may provide some inspiration for your characters’ personalities.

There was, I think, a lesson from the early part of episode 1.

When navigating the present, the answers often lie in the past.

The people who raised these columns [of the Parthenon] certainly had their share of challenges. Tyranny and famine. Economic and environmental collapse. Endless wars. An abysmal human rights record. Yet somehow they invented everything from science and philosophy to drama and democracy. Greece, not Egypt, not Persia, not Rome, became the cornerstone of western civilization.

As I recently mentioned to my friend, Erik, people (and cultures) are complex, both good and bad. The further back you go, the worse they appear. This is true even of historically significant characters and cultures. It’s very easy to look back at people and cultures and dwell on either their good qualities or their bad qualities. This results in either lionization or condemnation. Lionization may be naive, but unfair condemnation is even worse. It’s unfair to the person’s memory (I know they don’t care; they’re dead) because it fails to appreciate the context in which they existed. As a concept, evolution doesn’t just require change; it’s very nature is change, and in particular, change for the better. You can’t change for the better unless you come from a place that’s flawed. Moreover, in a harsher world, one must be harsher in character in order to survive. It’s our attempts (or lack thereof) to do better that are the fairer measure of someone’s worth (i.e., it’s the thought that counts). Without those harsh characters making those changes designed to give their children a better life, you wouldn’t be in such a place to haughtily look down on them.

I have a better idea: Assume all of these historically significant characters and cultures are imperfect so we don’t make their mistakes, but don’t ignore the qualities that had the most impact on our society, and temper that with your recognition of what they were attempting to do for humanity, as well as the context in which they were living. Were they a force for positive evolution? If so, then don’t dismiss them simply because you don’t think they’re perfect. Also, don’t criticize them because they didn’t advance as quickly as you’d prefer. Isaac Newton doesn’t deserve scorn because he didn’t discover the theory of relativity shortly after he discovered calculus. Evolution takes time and requires an environment that facilitates such change.

Besides, glass houses and all that. You’re not perfect either. None of us are, and none of us ever will be. The only people on this planet that have no past behavior to regret are psychopaths that care only about themselves. I hope no on reading this falls into that category.

We owe our present to our past. We stand on the shoulders of the achievements of the past, and it’s the only reason we can take the next steps forward.

So yeah, go watch it. It’s only three, one-hour episodes. As always, YMMV.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc
Follow Disney+ @disneyplus

Good Watch: The Finest Hours on Disney+ @EricBana67 @disneyplus #GoodWatch #QuarantineLife

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it. Other posts in this series can be accessed by clicking here.

Whether you’re an MCU nut like me, or a Pixar nut, there’s actually a lot more on Disney+ than what you subscribed for. Back in March, I watched the Finest Hours.

It starred Chris Pine as Bernard “Bernie” Webber, a real person who led a 1952 rescue of the SS Pendleton during a nor’easter. The opening act focuses on how Bernie met and fell in love with his future wife, Miriam. After that, the action picks up as the rescue gets underway, but the movie still revisits Miriam as she frets over what she sees as a suicide mission for Bernie. Whether you’re looking for action or characters, there’s at least a little bit in there for you.

The movie also stars Holliday Grainger, Casey Affleck, Eric Bana, and Ben Foster, all of whom did a good job.

For what it’s worth, the Finest Hours’ scores on Rotten Tomatoes are 64 from the critics and 66% from the audience.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc (please retweet!)
Follow Jason Silva @EricBana67
Follow Disney+ @disneyplus

 

Good Watch: Brain Games on Disney+ @JasonSilva @KeeganMKey @ActuallyNPH @disneyplus #GoodWatch #QuarantineLife

If you enjoy this post, please retweet it. Other posts in this series can be accessed by clicking here.

Whether you’re an MCU nut like me, or a Pixar nut, there’s actually a lot more on Disney+ than what you subscribed for. For me, one of them is Brain Games care of National Geographic.

Hosted by Neil Patrick Harris in season one, Jason Silva in seasons 2 through 7, and Keegan-Michael Key since, this show dives into how our brains work. Many of you are certainly aware of a lot of the oddities of how the brain works, but even in episodes where I knew the tricks, I was still sometimes fooled, and in any event there was still a lot to learn. Brain Games goes into detail as to how and why the brain does what it does. Each episode so far has been just over 20 minutes, and none of them depend on the other, so it’s easy to fit into your schedule.

If you’re into science, or just like getting fooled, give Brain Games a shot.

Follow me on Twitter @gsllc (please retweet!)
Follow Jason Silva @JasonSilva
Follow Keegan-Michael Key @KeeganMKey
Follow Neil Patrick Harris @ActuallyNPH
Follow Disney+ @disneyplus